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Step-by-Step Guide to the Effective Use of CodeIgniter

Step-by-Step Guide to the Effective Use of CodeIgniter

DebugMe is saying hello to CodeIgniter!

Undoubtedly, there are tens of thousands of people to know a lot about CodeIgniter. But, let’s keep this tutorial simple and elementary, so everyone can apprehend it and start working with the framework without having to take any professional course.

Step-by-Step Guide to Effective Use of CodeIgniter

 

Introduction to CodeIgniter

CodeIgniter is a PHP web application framework that enables programmers to build web applications faster. It is shipped with many helpful code libraries and helpers to simplify complex code operations such as email, form validation, image manipulation, file uploading, sessions, multi-lingual apps and creating APIs for your application. Based on a modular design, CodeIgniter can implement specific libraries adding to the speed of the framework.

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Where Can Girls Learn to Code?

Where Can Girls Learn to Code?

Programming and coding isn’t just for the men in this world, women also have the chance and the right to learn to code as well if they want to. So where can girls learn to code online without having to take the time to visit their local university? This expert guide will give you the sites needed for where you can learn and master coding online and also some offline places in the US. Let’s get started.

learn-to-code

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The Case Against Dynamic Typing

The Case Against Dynamic Typing

dynamic-typing

AN ARGUMENT FOR DYNAMIC TYPING is that by not enforcing the types of a function’s parameters, the function becomes more generalized, and thus more flexible and reusable. I argue that this flexibility versus automatically-verifiable correctness of the system is not a trade-off we need to make.

This post is in part inspired by Why Dynamic Typing Is Useful by Gary Bernhardt. I’ll concede that his post is published 10 years prior, so I’ve had plenty of time to build a counter-argument.

Why Is Dynamic Typing Useful?

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Code Review Done Right

Code Review Done Right

 

code review

The common approach to code review is in my opinion a sad one — you may not contribute until you have received the stamp of approval from a project senior. It’s an oddly bureaucratic process for a team of software developers to follow.

It’s the software development version of guilty until proven innocent.

Although the approach is prevalent, I don’t believe it’s the best one, or even a good one. What follows are my non-technical thoughts on conducting constructive, humane reviews of code.

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C#: Program Entirely with Static Methods

C#: Program Entirely with Static Methods

OK, that’s a provocative title to get your attention. This post is really about how one can move to a more functional programming style and remove the need for much of the apparatus of object-oriented programming, including interfaces and classes. In this post, I’m going to take some typical object-oriented C# code and refactor it in a more functional style. I’ll show that the result is more concise and easier to test.

Over the past couple of years I’ve noticed that my C# coding style has changed drastically under the influence of functional programming. Gone are interfaces and instance classes to be replaced by static methods, higher-order functions and closures. It’s somewhat ironic since I spent many years as a cheerleader for object-oriented programming and I considered static methods a code smell.

I guess if I look at my programming career, it has the following progression:

Procedural –> Object-Oriented –> Functional

The OO phase now looks like something of a detour.

C# has all the essential features you need for functional programming – higher-order functions, closures, lambda expressions – that allow you to entirely ditch the OO programming model. This results in more concise, readable and maintainable code. It also has a huge impact on unit testing, allowing one to do away with complex mocking frameworks, and write far simpler tests.

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